Cooperative Extension University of Wisconsin-Extension

Parenting the First Year: Links to Other Websites

Visit our Parenting the First Year links to additional information on topics of interest.

Month 1

  • Do yourself a favor
    If you continue to experience difficulties, this might be a sign of "postpartum blues." You may want to check out the following consumer health website for more information on this issue: my.WebMD
  • Where will baby sleep?
    For more information about the dangers of co-sleeping check out this report from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.
  • Crib safety
    You may also want to visit the American Academy of Pediatrics website. They provide information on choosing a crib, using a crib and safe bedding practices.
  • Buckle up baby, too!
    For more information about the selection of safe car seats for baby, check out the American Academy of Pediatrics car safety seat guide for families.
  • Why does baby cry?
    For more ideas on handling baby's colic you may want to consult WebMD. This website provides an overview of colic, as well as a list of frequently asked questions.
  • Feeding your baby
    The La Leche League website also provides answers to a long list of the most frequently asked questions about breastfeeding such as "How long should a mother breastfeed?" and "My breasts are sore. What can I do?" For more information about bottle feeding check out baby center. This site provides tips on things such as cleaning the bottles, warming the bottle, and feeding the baby.

Back to Top

Month 2

  • Thumb or pacifier?
    WebMD offers guidelines on the issue of thumbsucking, finger sucking and pacifier use for parents. They answer questions such as "why do children suck on things?", "can problems result from prolonged thumbsucking?", and "is sucking a pacifier less harmful?".
  • Premature babies
    The March of Dimes website provides support for parents of children born prematurely. It lists articles and other resources to help parents successfully cope with the special needs of their preemie.
  • Special needs children
    The American Academy of Pediatrics website provides additional information and resources for parents of children with special health care needs. The National Network for Child Care also has articles on a number of special needs topics, such as behavioral delays, cognitive delays, physical delays, social-emotional delays, and speech and language delays.
  • Baby shots
    The American Academy of Pediatrics provides an updated immunization schedule on their website. This schedule indicates the recommended ages for routine administration of childhood vaccines. The schedule we have provided is a simplified version of theirs.
  • Comforting crying babies
    For some additional tips on how to comfort baby check out this link to Colic and Crying on the American Academy of Pediatrics website.
  • Child care: What to look for
    For more information on selecting quality child care check out the Better Kid Care and University of Minnesota Extension websites. They provide a list of questions to ask when visiting child care settings, and offer advice aimed at helping you find the child care best suited for your child and family.

Back to Top

Month 3

  • Choosing safe baby toys
    For very interesting and informative tips on selecting safe toys, take a look at the Kids Health website.
  • Baby's sisters and brothers
    To find out more about issues related to sibling rivalry, check out the American Academy of Pediatrics website. It provides tips on what parents can do to manage conflicts between siblings.
  • Never hit or shake a child!
    For information on the causes of "Shaken Baby Syndrome" please consult the Saskatchewan Institute on Prevention of Handicaps website. This website provides advice on how to cope with a crying baby, how to prevent Shaken Baby Syndrome, and what happens to babies who are shaken. The primary message is "NEVER SHAKE A BABY."
  • Family fire safety
    For more tips on how you can keep your family safe from a home fire check out the American Academy of Pediatrics website. They include information on holding family fire drills and what to do in a fire.
  • Smokers
    The Environmental Protection Agency provides more information about the risks of "second hand smoke" for the health of children and adults. In addition, the sids (sudden infant death) network website presents research findings on smoking and the risk for SIDS.
  • Hiring a babysitter
    Check out the Idaho Department of Health website for more information on selecting a babysitter.

Back to Top

Month 4

  • Learning to talk
    For information on the importance of talking to your baby visit the Scholastic website. This website provides suggestions for teaching baby new words and using "turn taking' when talking to baby.
  • Moving to a big bathtub
    The Health Square website provides advice on bathing your baby. This includes information on "what you should know" about tub bathing and "what you should do" when bathing baby.
  • New foods for baby: Starting solid foods
    For more information on introducing solid foods to baby check out the University of Nebraska website. It provides advice on when and how to add solid foods to your baby's diet, as well as suggestions for times to start various foods such as cereals, fruits, vegetables and meats.
  • Think twice about baby walkers
    For more information on the dangers of baby walkers consult the American Academy of Pediatrics website and the Child's Health website.

Back to Top

Month 5

  • Child guidance: Discipline and safety
    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) website provides more advice on how to encourage good behavior. In addition, they provide a list of discipline strategies that work, as well as tips to make discipline more effective.
  • What is your baby like
    The Preventive Ounce provides an interactive website where you can fill out a temperament questionnaire on your baby. This will allow you to learn more about your child's temperament, what behaviors are "normal" for his/her temperament, and strategies for handling behaviors that are tailored to your child's temperament.
  • Prevent lead poisoning
    For more information on lead at home check out the St. Paul Ramsey County Department of Public Health website. The Minnesota Department of Health website also provides answers to frequently asked questions about lead poisoning, such as,"How can I tell if my child has too much lead in his/her body?", "What can I do to prevent lead poisoning?" and "Is there a way to reduce high blood levels of lead?"
  • Babyproof your home
    The Consumer Products Safety Commission website provides 12 tips on childproofing your home.

Back to Top

Month 6

  • How baby is changing
    The American Academy of Pediatrics website provides more information on children's dental health including how to help children establish good dental habits. WebMD offers advice on teething, answering such questions as "When does teething typically start?", "In what order do baby teeth usually come in?", and "How can you help baby be more comfortable while teething?".
  • Child guidance: Discipline is teaching
    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) website provides more advice on how to encourage good behavior. In addition, they provide a list of discipline strategies that work, as well as tips to make discipline more effective.
  • First aid for infant choking
    The Baby Center website provides guidelines for parents on choking prevention and first aid for infants. This includes information on how to figure out what is causing the problem, and how to do rescue breathing or CPR (including illustrations). They advise learning CPR and calling 911 in emergency situations.  The site also provides links to other pages with advice on how to reduce baby's risk of choking and foods to watch out for.
  • Hearing checklist
    For information on early hearing detection and intervention check out the Center for Disease Control website. This site provides answers to frequently asked questions (click on FAQ) about hearing detection and treatment options.  It also offers internet links to other organizations concerned with hearing screening and services for hearing impaired children and their families.
  • Baby's hearing
    The Kidshealth website provides more information on all your baby's senses - sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch. It also gives parents a list of warning signs that may indicate hearing or vision problems.

Back to Top

Month 7

  • Child guidance: Keeping calm
    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) website provides more advice on how to encourage good behavior. In addition, they provide a list of discipline strategies that work, as well as tips to make discipline more effective.
  • Baby's eyes
    The Kidshealth website provides more information on your baby's sight and other senses - hearing, taste, smell and touch. It also gives parents a list of warning signs that may indicate vision or hearing problems.
  • Language games
    For information on the importance of talking to your baby visit the Scholastic website. This website provides suggestions for teaching baby new words and using "turn taking' when talking to baby.
  • Sun safety
    For more tips on keeping baby safe in the sun check out the Babycenter safety website. They provide information on how to prevent sunburn and how to treat a mild sunburn.
  • Traveling with a baby
    For more tips on traveling with an infant check out the University of Michigan Children's Hospital website. This site includes information on car, air, and train travel, as well as tips for taking babies out to restaurants. The La Leche League also answers questions about traveling with a breastfed baby.
  • About weaning
    The La Leche League provides additional information on weaning, including ideas on how to wean your baby, and suggestions for when sudden weaning is necessary.

Back to Top

Month 8

Back to Top

Month 9

  • Learning to talk
    For information on the importance of talking to your baby visit the Scholastic website. This website provides suggestions for teaching baby new words and using "turn taking' when talking to baby.
  • Lead alert
    For more information on lead at home check out the St. Paul Ramsey County Department of Public Health website. The Minnesota Department of Health website also provides answers to frequently asked questions about lead poisoning, such as,"How can I tell if my child has too much lead in his/her body?", "What can I do to prevent lead poisoning?" and "Is there a way to reduce high blood levels of lead?"
  • Babyproofing when baby can stand
    The American Academy of Pediatrics provides safety tips for children from 6 to 12 months of age. This includes information on preventing falls, burns, drowning, poisoning and choking. The Babycenter safety website also contains suggestions for babyproofing around the house, and offers links to related safety topics.
  • Helping curiosity grow
    For more ideas on activities to enhance your infant's development check out the National Network for Child Care website.  They provide examples of how infants learn through exploration, and ways parents can create a safe learning environment.
  • Your baby's sisters and brothers
    To find out more about issues related to sibling rivalry, such as "why do my kids fight" and "how can I help my kids get along," visit the KidsHealth website.
  • Active play with baby
    For information on the causes of "Shaken Baby Syndrome" please consult the Saskatchewan Institute on Prevention of Handicaps website. This website provides advice on how to cope with a crying baby, how to prevent Shaken Baby Syndrome, and what happens to babies who are shaken. The primary message is "NEVER SHAKE A BABY."
  • Baby learns to feed himself
    For more information on finger foods for baby check out the University of Nebraska website. It also provides advice on when and how to add solid foods to your baby's diet, as well as suggestions for times to start various foods such as cereals, fruits, vegetables and meats.
  • Child guidance: Five keys to good discipline
    The Kidshealth website also provides a list of nine steps to more effective parenting. The list includes ideas such as "catching your child being good" and "being a good role model." These ideas will help you cope with child raising responsibilities and allow you to enjoy your child too.

Back to Top

Month 10

  • Child guidance: Is baby a tease?
    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) website provides more advice on how to encourage good behavior. In addition, they provide a list of discipline strategies that work, as well as tips to make discipline more effective.
  • Getting ready to walk
    For information on keeping a cruising baby safe check out the baby center safety website. This site provides advice on how you can keep baby safe without stifling his/her natural curiosity. It also has links to other safety related issues such as child proofing checklists.
  • Special for employed parents
    On the North Dakota State University Extension website you'll find more information on balancing work and family, and tips to make things easier.
  • Practicing to use a spoon
    The nutritionist at parentsplace website offers a number of hints to help self feeding go smoothly. These ideas include introducing finger foods and giving baby a spoon with "sticky" food to start the learning process.
  • Eat together as a family
    Check out this website from the Dairy Council of California for more information about the benefits of family mealtimes.

Back to Top

Month 11

  • Child guidance: Coping with baby's frustration
    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) website provides more advice on how to encourage good behavior. In addition, they provide a list of discipline strategies that work, as well as tips to make discipline more effective. Also, The Preventive Ounce provides an interactive website where you can fill out a temperament questionnaire on your baby. This will allow you to learn more about your child's temperament, what behaviors are "normal" for his/her temperament, and strategies for handling behaviors that are tailored to your child's temperament.
  • Is your baby highly active?
    The Preventive Ounce provides an interactive website where you can fill out a temperament questionnaire on your baby. This will allow you to learn more about your child's temperament, what behaviors are "normal" for his/her temperament, and strategies for handling behaviors that are tailored to your child's temperament.
  • Water safety
    The babycenter safety website provides more information on water safety for baby and the potential hazards for baby in the bathtub or at the pool/ lake.
  • Baby shots reminder
    The American Academy of Pediatrics provides an updated immunization schedule on their website. This schedule indicates the recommended ages for routine administration of childhood vaccines. The schedule we have provided is a simplified version of theirs.
  • Build your child's self-esteem
    For more information on how you can help your child develop self esteem check out The Canadian Mental Health Association website.
  • Do yourself a favor
    The iVillage website suggests a number of ways mothers can "take time for themselves," while dealing with the other demands on their time.

Back to Top

Month 12

  • When to toilet train
    The American Academy of Pediatrics website provide guidelines for parents on toilet training. This includes information on when to start toilet training and tips for toilet trainings.
  • Is your baby cautious?
    The Preventive Ounce provides an interactive website where you can fill out a temperament questionnaire on your baby. This will allow you to learn more about your child's temperament, what behaviors are "normal" for his/her temperament, and strategies for handling behaviors that are tailored to your child's temperament.
  • Sex roles
    For more information on how educators/parents can help young children grow beyond the traditional gender roles check out this article on Dolls, Trucks, and Identity. By promoting gender equity it is believed that parents can raise "competent" girls and "caring" boys.
  • Learning starts early
    For information on how parents can help their children's language and literacy development, check out the Zero to Three website. This is an interactive website dedicated solely to the healthy development of infants and toddlers. In addition, try this short article by University of Georgia Extension that provides 10 facts about brain development and things you can do to promote early brain development.
  • Prevent childhood poisoning
    The babycenter safety website provides additional information on poison-proofing your house. They present a list of specific steps to take to poison proof that include - conducting a room by room inventory of hazardous substances and never referring to any kind of medicine as candy.
  • Many babies want to suck
    WebMD offers guidelines on the issue of thumbsucking, finger sucking and pacifier use for parents. They answer questions such as "why do children suck on things?", "can problems result from prolonged thumbsucking?", and "is sucking a pacifier less harmful?".
  • What to feed baby
    For more information on feeding your infant and toddler check out the MedlinePlus website. You will find advice specific for the age of your child, as well as numerous articles on various nutrition topics.
  • Child guidance: Setting limits
    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) website provides more advice on how to encourage good behavior. In addition, they provide a list of discipline strategies that work, as well as tips to make discipline more effective.

Back to Top